Jamie Oliver’s TED Prize wish: Teach every child about food

Speaker: Jamie Oliver

Length: 21:54

Summary

Jamie Oliver, a British chef and TV personality, delivers a talk on the importance of food education. Jamie presents a series of health related statistics. “Statistically, 2/3 of the people in this room are overweight or obese.” “25% of deaths are caused by heart disease” He talks about his experiences, visiting Huntington, West Virginia, the most obese town in the United States and shares the personal stories of a few of the people he met there. His conclusion is that there is a triangle of influence that is shaping the landscape of food.

1) Home

  • Unhealthy food served at home

2) School

  • Reaches 31 million kids , twice a day, 180 days a year
  • Serves highly processed food (burgers, pizza, sloppy joes)

3) Main St

  • Made up of fast food and supermarkets
  • Plagued by misleading labels (low fat, means high sugar)

After showing a clip of some young students misidentifying cauliflower as broccoli and turnips as onions, Jamie lays out his vision of the future. He calls for food ambassadors in supermarkets to help people shop and teach them to cook simple healthy recipes.. He wants the government to help get big brands to put food education at the heart of their businesses. Back in Huntington, WV, Jamie worked on swapping the unhealthy menus of the schools there with healthier foods. He was able to make the switch for $6500, a fraction of their original budget.

Jamie ends his passionate speech with his TED Prize wish: “For you to help a strong, sustainable movement to educate every child about food, inspire families to cook again and empower people everywhere to fight obesity.”

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Rory Sutherland: Life lessons of an Ad Man

Speaker: Rory Sutherland

Length: 19:12

Summary

The talk is focused around the value of intangibles, specifically from the perspective of advertising. He tells us that all value is subjective, BUT an intangible change can be just as satisfying as a physical change. Frederick the Great, of Prussia, wanted more the country to adopt potatoes as their primary crop. But people thought potatoes looked ugly, tasted weird, and farmers had no desire to grow them. Frederick realized the farmers would rather be jailed than forced to grow potatoes. So he took a new approach, and decided to re brand the potato – changing its perceived value. He declared that potatoes were only for the royal grew them in his garden, protected around the clock by his guards. Not long after, people gathered to create an underground potato market.

Rory tells another story about the creation of intangible value that he experienced in his own work. An intern was given a task to create a new advertising campaign for the popular cereal Shreddies. Shreddies are the equivalent of chex mix – square shaped pieces of wheat. Instead of making a change to the product, the company focused on changing how people perceived it. This was the result:

The analogy is clear: We need to learn to appreciate things that already exist before creating new things.

“When you place a value on things like health and love and learn to place a material value on what you’ve previously discounted for being merely intangible … you realize you’re much, much wealthier than you ever imagined.”